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Archive for September, 2010|Monthly archive page

Websites: The Curse of Stale Content

In General on September 23, 2010 at 21:30

Websites: The Curse of Stale ContentOne of the first things that I try to persuade clients about is the need to be able to update their website themselves — there’s no point having to send changes to a webmaster or agency, something that could take days.

Most clients see the value in this, but keeping the content fresh, that’s a different matter.

Why is fresh content important? Read the rest of this entry »

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Social Media Panel at Serviced Apartments Asia

In General on September 21, 2010 at 08:27

Serviced Apartments AsiaLast week i had the privilege of being on a panel at Serviced Apartments Asia in Singapore, discussing Social Media, and the opportunities it presented for the industry. A review of this is available in a post i wrote on the Keen site.

Anthony Green – September 2010

Hotel Minibar: Go Ahead Punk, Make My Day

In General on September 15, 2010 at 18:01

Dirty HarryChecking into a hotel yesterday, the guy on the desk informed me that the minibar was “pressure-sensitive“, so if you took something out and then put it back, you’d still be charged. I mean, what next, you open the door and the minibar points a Magnum in your face, saying “Go Ahead Punk, Make My Day” in its best Dirty Harry voice? I understand that they want to maximise revenue, and people regularly use the minibar and refill at 7-11, but surely it’s not come to this? Remember, before wifi became the number one gripe for travelers, minibars were the topic of the day. Innovative hotels, mostly in the USA, were even emptying their minibars so that guests could chill their own drinks. In the end i was too scared to open the door (although the tariff sheet was enough to scare me off).

Anyone seen this before?

Widescreen Websites — the New Design Reality

In General on September 7, 2010 at 20:55

toshiba-satellite-widescreenWeb designers and marketers have a right to feel cheated — no sooner had they started building websites to match the shiny new big monitors that people were getting with their desktops, than the whole landscape changed. Instead of large, square monitors, the market shifted, and in came widescreen monitors. The shape matched the HD TVs that everyone has been buying like crazy, and the fact is that TVs and movies look great!

This created a problem: nearly all laptops, and now most desktops, come with screens that are much wider, but offer only 600, 768, or 800 pixels in height. If that doesn’t mean much to you, previously the most common size was much bigger, 1024 high — so much more space — whereas now the fold is really high up the page.

Web designers were among the last to notice, with their large monitors. Business users noticed, with their ultra-small laptops, and many design teams were caught out. Read the rest of this entry »